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Milkweed
Doug Muirhead
Milkweed Fluff
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Monarch caterpillar
Jane LeBlanc
Monarch caterpillars enjoy the milkweed I planted for them in my yard.
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Milkweed
Lois Fowler
I belong to a hiking group. I enjoy taking close ups of plants, bugs and wildlife.
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Euchaetes Egle
Alexandra Brown - McKie

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Large Milkweed Bug - Oncepeltus Fasciatus
Debbie Oppermann
Large Milkweed Bugs on Milkweed pods in the fall
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Milkweed
Linda Danyluk
Could not resist taking this picture of milkweed buds and newly opened blossoms. Long grass and the lake in the background give an unusual look to the photo.
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Monarch Caterpillar
Heather Peacock
Monarch Caterpillar eating the milkweed plants in the garden.
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Milkweed Tussock Caterpillar
Heather Peacock
Left some wild weeds in a new rock garden. Caterpillar was enjoying the plants
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Milkweed
Astrid Schuh
This milkweed was sparkling and glowing in the sun and I had to take this photo. It looks so silky and is just waiting to propagate.
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Nicole Watson
While visiting this local conservation area here in Kingston I noticed that all the Milkweed plants were starting to open up and because it was some what breezy that day the seeds were blowing out of the pods, so I grabbed my macro lens out of my vehicle and took some shots, it was a little challenging in the wind but I gave it a go anyways.
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Milkweed
Nicole Watson
While visiting this local conservation area here in Kingston I noticed that all the Milkweed plants were starting to open up and because it was some what breezy that day the seeds were blowing out of the pods, so I grabbed my macro lens out of my vehicle and took some shots, it was a little challenging in the wind but I gave it a go anyways.
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Common Milkweed/Asclepias syriaca
Gary Howard
The Common Milkweed seeds about to blow into the wind. Along Sawmill Creek Wetlands, Ottawa. The seed pod had burst open and was about to release the seeds.
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Mark Robinson
Milkweed seed pod explosion.
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Monarch caterpillar
Jane LeBlanc
A Monarch caterpillar rests under a milkweed leaf, with the colours of fall behind it.
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Monarch caterpillar
Jane LeBlanc
A Monarch caterpillar hangs in the early morning cool under a milkweed leaf in my yard in New Brunswick.
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Monarch caterpillar
Jane LeBlanc
A Monarch caterpillar enjoys the Common Milkweed in my yard in New Brunswick.
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Eastern Kingbird - Tyrannus Tyrannus
Debbie Oppermann
The Eastern Kingbird, is described as a bird in a business suit, with it's dark gray underparts and white tip to the tail. This elegant songbird can be quite aggressive, an actual tyrant, when protecting it's nest from predators like the hawks, crows and blue jays, hence the scientific name of Tyrannus Tyrannus. The Kingbirds were in the process of building the nest and I caught this one with a mouthful!
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Monarch Butterfly Caterpillar
Larry Kowalchuk
In September i always go and look for these Caterpillars to photograph. This year seems to more plentiful than previous years.
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milkweed
Ken Kishibe
Milkweed Silk
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GREAT SPANGLED FRITTILARY
BRENDA DOHERTY
I SPOTTED THIS GREAT SPANGLED FRITTILARY IN MY FLOWER GARDEN .
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Jane LeBlanc
Jane LeBlanc
Monarch caterpillars munch on Common Milkweed in my backyard.
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Monarch butterfly
Cindy Conlin
Monarch butterfly enjoying the Milkweed that was in full bloom in mid summer.
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Milkweed
Debbie Oppermann
In the fall, the seed pods of the wildflower Milkweed, burst open to allow the hundreds of silky white seeds to disburse and hopefully produce new plants. If there are no Milkweed plants, there are no Monarch butterflies.
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milkweed pod
Mike Crosby
a high key photo, with the snow in the background, a spent milkweed pod. While walking a trail in Riverwood park, it caught my eyem the grey pod, against the fresh snow.
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Jadzia von Heymann
After a couple of windy, bitterly cold days, the vegetation on the shoreline was covered in ice, as was this.....Milkweed on Ice !
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Milkweed
Tobi Szufranowicz
Dried winter field of milkweed plants.
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Milkweed pod
Tobi Szufranowicz
December shot of a milkweed pod that had opened but not distributed.
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Milkweed
Carol Hamilton
Milkweed and the fly
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Blue Jay
Bill McMullen
This was a fun photo to take! Blue Jays were busy foraging in my back yard and landing in the most unusual places. I captured a shot of this Blue Jay on top of one of my pumpkins that were set up in a seasonal display!
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Monarch Butterfly
Bill McMullen
This photo was made possible by being in the right place at the right time. Originally, I was photographing various insects when I came across a monarch chrysalis with the butterfly ready to emerge. I was able to get photos and some video during the whole process. At this stage, the monarch is preparing to unfold its wings and dry out.
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Asclepias syriaca, or common milkweed
Louise Zimanyi
A beautiful October Fall day in mid afternoon light and a gentle wind in the Humber Arboretum. I was collecting seeds as part of the documentation of the lifecycle of the monarch caterpillar and butterfly for Humber's Forest Nature Program at the Child Development Centre as well as for participants at the Lawson Foundation's policy and research symposium on outdoor play.
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Asclepias syriaca, or common milkweed
Louise Zimanyi
A beautiful October Fall day in mid afternoon light and a gentle wind in the Humber Arboretum. I was collecting seeds as part of the documentation of the lifecycle of the monarch caterpillar and butterfly for Humber's Forest Nature Program at the Child Development Centre as well as for participants at the Lawson Foundation's policy and research symposium on outdoor play.
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Leafcutter Bee species
Bob Noble
This bee was feeding on milkweed flowers in a small pollinator garden created by the City of Brampton. I was photographing the variety of pollinators that were at the garden and discovered this bee slowly moving on the flowers. I was able to get a low angle to highlight its amazing eyes with the background of the flowers.
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Monarch Butterfly (in chrysalis)
Bill McMullen
A clearly visible monarch butterfly can be seen in its chrysalis moments before it emerged. This was all about being in the right place at the right time
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MILKWEED
BRENDA DOHERTY
I TOOK THIS PHOTO OF A MILKWEED SEED POD WHILE WALKING ON A TRAIL NEAR MY HOME.
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Milkweed
Barb D'Arpino
Milkweed going to seed during the autumn.
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Common Milkweed
Jane LeBlanc
Milkweed seeds blow in the wind.
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Common Milkweed
Jane LeBlanc
Milkweed seeds are blown in the wind as the seed pods open.
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Pink Lady's Slipper (cypripedium acaule)
Lindsay Bond
Out for a fall forest walk with my dad, we came across this beautiful display. I ultimately decided that black and white allowed the texture of the fluff to really come through.
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Monarch Caterpillar
Marion Buccella
'Monarch Caterpillar on Milkweed Pod' I am always on the lookout for Monarch butterflies and caterpillars. I was delighted to find this caterpillar on a mildweed pod.
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Monarch (Danaus plexippus)
Greg Shchepanek
A weathered Monarch rests on common milkweed, almost like waiting for it to bloom in a field of Southern Quebec.
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Milkweed
Victoria McGraw
I have been dedicating myself to photography (and physiotherapy!) since a car accident forced me to take a leave of absence from teaching in September 2014. During this challenging time, photography has been a distraction, a creative outlet, a chance to collaborate with others, and a fantastic opportunity to continue my pursuit of lifelong learning. I'd been noticing this milkweed during my drive home in the late afternoon... as the sun gets lower in the sky the fluff becomes very luminous and makes a compelling subject.
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milkweed tussock moth catapillar
jai wright
the milkweeds are almost always filled with all types of small bugs and it is great fun to photograph
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Monarch
Kathleen Hock
I signed David Suzuki's manifesto to bring the a Monarch Butterflies back to Canada. In June I started with six caterpillars and at the end of August I released fifty for the migration back to Mexico.
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milkweed seed
Isabelle Marozzo
one milk weed seed floating in the water
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Asclepias syriaca/Common Milkweed
Wendy Duffus
For The Monarchs Cold, windy, October day in Basin Depot - no leaves left on the trees but found colour among the grasses.
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HUMMINGBIRD MOTH
BRENDA DOHERTY
WHILE WORKING IN MY GARDEN, I SPOTTED THIS HUMMINGBIRD MOTH GETTING NECTAR FROM A SWAMP MILKWEED. I RAN INTO THE HOUSE, GOT MY CAMERA AND SNAPPED A PICTURE.
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MONARCH CATERPILLAR
BRENDA DOHERTY
I PLANT MILKWEED IN MY GARDEN FOR THE MONARCH BUTTERFLIES TO LAY EGGS ON. SO THIS IS ONE OF SEVERAL CATERPILLARS I SPOTTED.
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milkweed
laurie campbell
Angelic down. Late fall has many treasures, and on of them is the exploding see pods of milkweed. The fibre is soft, and wispy. No wonder it attracts birds and insects in search of late season food.
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milkweed
laurie campbell
Angelic down. Late fall has many treasures, and on of them is the exploding see pods of milkweed. The fibre is soft, and wispy. No wonder it attracts birds and insects in search of late season food.
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Rayma Hill
Rayma Hill

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MILKWEED SEED
BRENDA DOHERTY
I HAVE MILKWEEDS IN MY FLOWER GARDEN. I SAW THAT SOME HAD BURST OPEN AND THIS SEED WAS CLINGING TO A LEAF.SO I SNAPPED A PHOTO.
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MONARCH CATERPILLAR
BRENDA DOHERTY
I PLANT MILKWEED IN MY GARDEN FOR THE MONARCH BUTTERFLIES TO LAY THEIR EGGS ON. THIS CATERPILLAR IS EATING THE PLANT.
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milkweed
grace howe
ant colony inside a milkweed plant
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Black Swallowtail, Swamp Milkweed, native bee
Dave Barr
Taken while observing pollinator activity in a dry meadow habitat. Three different insect pollinators can be seen in association with this Swamp Milkweed blossom.
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milkweed
Isabelle Marozzo
there is plenty of wild milkweed in my gardens....there will be more next year...and some of the seeds look like little heads and shoulders ready to explore and merge with earth and multiply ..
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milkweed
Suzanne Southon
Milkweed Seed and Fall Colours
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Milkweed
Suzanne Southon
There is a park close by and I went out early in the morning. Lucky for me the sun had barely risen and the milkweed was covered in dew.
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Black Swallowtail, native bee and Swamp Milkweed
Dave Barr
Snapped on a pollinator walk at the Don Valley Brick Works.
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Milkweed beetle
Robert Guimont
High five? Was looking for insects to photograph when I noticed this beetle slowly walking towards me.
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Swamp Milkweed Leaf Beetle
Shirley Donald
'Stepping out' This beetle, one of many, was found on a Common Milkweed.
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Swamp Milkweed Leaf Beetle
Shirley Donald
'Stepping out' This beetle, one of many, was found on a Common Milkweed.
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milkweed beetle
Robert Guimont
wandering around the milkweed, found many of these. Was lucky enough to get a shot of this one in flight.
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Debbie Oppermann
Butterfly Flower - Guelph Ontario - The Common Milkweed, Asclepias Syriaca, is a lovely wildflower that is essential to the Monarch Butterflies as it is a host to the Monarch caterpillars,it has beautiful clusters of pinkish purple flowers
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Milkweed
Brenda Doherty
While out walking on the local trail, I spotted this beautiful milkweed pod that had just burst open.
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Milkweed
James Craig
On a hike with friends we came upon a meadow filled with milkweed in full bloom. It was striking to see so many milkweed blooms with their interesting colours and patterns covering this field. With the significant focus on preserving milkweed for monarch butterflies, it was encouraging to see so much milkweed growing freely.
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James Craig
On a hike with friends, we came upon a large meadow filled with milkweed in full bloom.
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Milkweed
Donna Santarossa
No monarchs on the milkweed yet, unfortunately.
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Milk Weed
Dawn Mercer
Milk Weed Pod Close Up. Autumn time in the park. This photo was taken on a morning nature walk at Forks Of The Credit Provincial Park in Caledon, Ontario
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Milkweed
Linda Courtney
Milkweed spreading their seeds is a beautiful sight.
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Milkweed
Elizabeth Cartier
While taking a leisurely autumn stroll in Kingston's Lemoine Point Conservation Area, I passed by this opened milkweed pod. It appeared as though the seeds were just waiting on the slightest wind to carry them away.
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Milkweed plant
Catherine Sosney
I was taking pictures of a milkweed plant with sun shining behind it. When I viewed this picture at a later time, I was surprised to see that by the placement of the seeds and pod, it took on the appearance of a white dove.
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Milkweed plant
Catherine Sosney
After reading about the decline in the Monarch butterfly population, I started looking at milkweed plants in a different way. I noticed this plant bursting its seeds with the sun shining behind it and thought it would make a striking photo.
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Common milkweed seed
Leslie Abram
"Hang On" I chose this milkweed seed hanging on to a little stick to symbolize the fate of the monarch butterflies. It is the host plant for the caterpillars of this beautiful and iconic species. They need the milkweed to survive, and yet people still consider it a weed, even though it has been taken off of the noxious weed list.
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Red Milkweed Beetle
Jeannine St-Amour
The Red Milkweed Beetle (Tetraopes tetraophthalmus) feeds and shelters on the milkweed plant. This clever creature bites through the midrib of the leaf in a few spots near the leaf tip. This stops the milky latex-like sap from flowing to that part of the leaf, making it possible for the beetle to eat it without having its mouth parts glued together by the sticky substance.
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Snail on Milkweed
Marion Buccella
I was walking in Springbank Park, photographing the flowers when I spied this snail on the milkweed. He poked his head out long enough for me to capture this image.
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Monarch Butterfly
Caroline Partridge
I had some children over to pick flowers in my gardens and we found this beauty on the asclepias butterfly plant. We have a lot of fun and they learn a lot about nature on my property.
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cabbage butterfly
Bo Davey
Sometimes in the butterfly world, we overlook the beauty of the cabbage butterfly due to it's lack of colour. I am trying to show the other side and remind everyone of the importance of all species in our eco-system. As a butterfly enthusiast and conservation promoter, the incredible small numbers of this somewhat ordinary looking species was extremely alarming this year. It was a bonus to capture it on a milkweed which we usually associate with just the monarch species.
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Milkweed
Sherry Hambly
Sparkling Milkweed. The milkweed seed pod, after it bursts open produces a lovely fine silky fibre and small brown seed that is very photogenic in the right light.
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Common Milkweed
Shelley O'Connell
Late in the afternoon, I saw only the blossom on this plant and discovered it was Common Milkweed
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Gail Marchessault
I visited the Shirley Richardson Butterfly Garden in Assiniboine Park Conservancy every week all summer, and took hundreds of photos of butterflies. This shot of a monarch caterpillar underneath a brightly coloured milkweed plant appeals to me for its strong colours and simple lines. The milkweed is a very important plant to monarch butterflies as the caterpillars eat only milkweed and would not survive without it. A large caterpillar can eat a milkweed leaf in under 4 minutes.
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Milkweed
Tom Lusk
Winter milkweed against a snowy background.
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Red Milkweed Beetle
Jeannine St-Amour
I had decided that morning to do only insects close-up. Some subjects are not easy but the Red Milkweed Beetle was very cooperative and decided to focus on them. They are very clever creatures. They bite through the midrib of the leaf in a few spots near the leaf tip. This stops the milky latex-like sap from flowing to that part of the leaf, making it possible for the beetle to eat it without having its mouth parts glued together by the sticky substance.
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seeds, milkweed
Isabelle Marozzo
captured this explosion of milkweed seeds with the gentle breeze of wind, although there were many plants, this year I have only seen a few butterflies
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milkweed
Cynthia Prideaux
Milkweed, ready to fly
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Milkweed
Jim Cumming
I searched for the perfect milkweed. Took me awhile till I finally found one I liked
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Milkweed
Jadzia von Heymann
While out for a hike around the falls, I cam across several milkweed plants which were in their glory. This particular one was bursting with seed. I liked how the light played on the feathery tails of the seeds.
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Asclepias syriaca (Common Milkweed)
Joerg Thomsen
Another shot taken during the hike at Happy Valley organized by TFN
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Asclepias syriaca (Common Milkweed)
Joerg Thomsen
My friend Jess invited me to join a hike organized by the Toronto Field Naturalists, exploring the Happy Valley Nature Reserve
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Bugs on Milkweed
Susan Casey
Orange insects were a surprise to spot on the milkweed
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Swamp Milkweed
Mary McGee
I was walking along the marshy boardwalk trail when this flower popped out at me. What a beautiful flower. To my surprise, I found out it was milkweed! There's beauty in everything!
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Milkweed
Lindsay Serjeantson

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Milkweed Seed Pods
Debbie Oppermann
I love the Milkweed plant at this stage with the seeds bursting from the pods - just beautiful- This was taken along a trail near the Bird Sanctuary
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Butterfly Milkweed
Jadzia von Heymann
Photo taken during a fall outing
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Monarch Butterfly
Debbie Oppermann
This beautiful Monarch was captured in an open field in the bush near our home - it was on it's favourite plant, Milkweed The Milkweed plants are diminishing as urban development continues to expand into former fields and bush areas - the Monarch relies on the Milkweed for survival - who would not want to see this beautiful Monarch butterfly in the future
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Milkweed
Laurie Fischer
Milkweeds are particularly attractive in the fall and the contrast in texture between the rough outer seed pod and the silky inner tendrils is a photographer's dream!
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Showy Milkweed
Marc Lang
While stalking birds I was struck by the beauty of this almost tropical-looking flower. The bright noonday sun illuminated the interior and gives it an almost 3D effect. One of my favorite wildflowrs.
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Common Milkweed
Shaun Abbott
I loved the delicate colour of the flowers on this milkweed plant
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milkweed
Ruth Barnhard
This picture was taken on the edge of fanshawe lake, London. I know that these plants can be invasive and are considered a pest by many people. I see as a nuturer of the monarch butterfly. What beautiful colours and textures.
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bill morden
walking on a path and the sun light on the rose hips with the milkweed seed just caught my eye Thought it was rather different